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Aviation News concerning Hurrican Sandy

AERObridge is coordinating donated aircraft to bring first response donations to Farmingdale NY (FRG) where they will be picked up and transported via truck to Staten Island and Lower Manhattan to assist 5000 children and disadvantaged families.
They are specifically looking for aircraft that can immediately fly in food from Elkhart, IN, Nashville, TN and medical and general supplies from Oklahoma City, OK. BUT If there are pilots with aircraft that can acquire food, water, winter jackets, batteries, and flashlights immediately, we can receive those donations in Farmingdale, as well. Please contact us for clearance as we have PPR (Prior Permission Required) approval for humanitarian relief flights. This effort is a very limited aviation response for a maximum of 7 days until mass care donations can be made available.
http://www.aerobridge.org/

If you can be of assistance either flying donations in or have donations to offer, contact AERObridge President Marianne Stevenson via email at mstevenson@aerobridge.org

Powerful winds and flooding caused damage across the mid-Atlantic. Here are a few notes, for more see:
http://www.aopa.org/aircraft/articles/2012/121101east-coast-airports-rec...

Cape May County Airport in Cape May, N.J. was just south of the storm as it made landfall, but escaped serious damage. At 23 feet above sea level, it is the highest ground in the area, and several emergency response and other vehicles operated by local government were sheltered there, according to Bill Craft, an AOPA volunteer. Local officials also set up a pet shelter at the airport. The airport was fully operational Nov. 1, according to the airport manager.

Igor Sikorsky Memorial Airport in Bridgeport, Conn., saltwater pushed by the storm surge flooded much of the property, and a T-hangar was blown off of its foundation. AOPA Airport Support Network volunteer David Faile said Nov. 1 that operations had apparently resumed on at least one runway, and FBO staff were hosing down the landing gear of aircraft that weathered the storm in hangars. Dozens of aircraft had been tied down outside, and it remained unclear how badly they were damaged in the flood.

Teterboro Airport, ASN volunteer Steve Riethof said extensive planning and preparation by the airport management helped mitigate damage. One of the hangars at Teterboro was made available to nearby residents fleeing a sudden flood in neighboring towns that followed the storm’s departure, when a river berm gave way, Riethof reported.